Castles & Palaces - Movies & TV

London’s Historic Houses That Look Like They’re Straight Out Of Bridgerton

If you were one of the 60+ million people who binge-watched Bridgerton on Netflix, you may find yourself dreaming about afternoon teas in lush drawing rooms, promenades in the park and showing your moves on the ballroom floor. The good news is…you can do a lot those things in London (once all of this passes obviously)

Although Bridgerton was mostly filmed in Bath, there are a lot of historic houses you’d swear were in the show. And remember…just as Bridgerton is a creative reimagining of the Regency era, these suggestions have taken a few creative liberties.

Bridgerton Inspired Ballrooms

I’ve lost track of the number of balls in season one. Which is not too weird as back in the 19th century, the ball was the place to be. During the summer months, balls took place outside and in winter, they were held indoors. Not all houses were blessed with their own designated ballrooms and instead used smaller, connecting rooms for events.

It would need a bit of dressing up, but the hall in Banqueting House could easily pass for the one we saw the debutantes presented to the Queen in Episode 1.

I wouldn’t mind crossing off the Waltz on my ‘dance card’ with a beautiful beau at the Osterley House ballroom.

I could definitely enjoy a glass of lemonade while taking in the various artefacts that adorn the walls of the Wallace Collection.

How about watching the new couple of the season doing Le Boulanger at the Orleans House ballroom.

Drawing Rooms in London Historic Houses

There are also many scenes in living rooms – or ‘drawing rooms’ as they used to be called. Depending on the house, you’d have a formal drawing room where guests were welcomed and an informal one for family members. The name is taken from the 16th century term ‘withdrawing room’. And here I always thought it was called that because it’s where the ladies took up their pencils and pens to draw. Oh Tea…


I can’t imagine a better place for afternoon tea with fresh sandwiches, biscuits and scones than the Sir John Soane Museum drawing room?

Imagine receiving a call from a respected Viscount in this drawing room at Strawberry Hill House.

Why not take a break to finish your embroidery in the Hall House?

I could definitely see myself reading the latest edition of the gossip paper at the Wallace Collection.

Historic Gardens

Bridgeton wouldn’t be complete without its luscious gardens. Pleasure gardens were another way to flaunt back in the 19th century. Vauxhall Gardens haven’t sadly been restored, but there are other impressive ones you can visit.

Imagine a moon-lit romantic stroll at midnight in the Hampton Court Gardens

Or escaping to Eltham Palace Gardens for a little breath of fresh air.

Better not get spotted with a secret lover in the Osterley House gardens.

Historic House Study Rooms

These rooms are where the male head of the house did his day-to-day tasks, if he wasn’t at a gentlemen’s club, that is.

Catch-up on some finances in the study at Fulham Palace.

Or have a brandy while you rethink your life choices in the Sir John Soane Museum study.

Bridgerton Inspired Exteriors

Walking through Mayfair will give you all the Bridgerton vibes. Some exteriors outside Mayfair include:

Danston House in Bexley could easily pass for Lady Danbury’s House.

The entrance of Hampton Court Palace doubled as Queen Charlotte’s residence in the first episode.

accidentally wes anderson london

Meanwhile Kew Palace is where the real Queen Charlotte (her husband and 15 children) used to spend their summers.

I wouldn’t mind escaping to Marble Hill House to get away from all the ‘ton’ gossip.

And last but not least…

While most of the ‘ton wouldn’t be seen dead in a kitchen, I’d love to try warming up my milk in the basement cooking area at Sir Jon Soane Museum.

How about dinner with the guests or the fam like this one at the Dickens Museum?

While it’s not in Mayfair, this little street in nearby Bloomsbury does look like it houses your go-to modiste, tea shop and an ice-cream parlour.

See you next season…

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