Category Archives: London

London - Seen & Done

Museum Musings: Tate Britain

Who doesn’t love visiting a museum? I know it’s of my favourite rainy Saturday morning activities and now the season has started I’ll be doing another round of museums and seeing which one is truly worth your visit. I want to make it as fact based as possible, so I’ve opted for a traditional grading system.

I’m looking at the 4 things that are most important to me: location, exhibits, value for money and the layout. So, how easy is it to find your way around? Do you need a map? Does how they’ve arranged all the exhibits make sense or leave you more confused than when you entered? Is it far from the city centre and can I combine it with a visit to something else? To top it all off, there are extra points to be had for places with a wow factor.

Kicking off with the Museum that’s been the home to British art since 1897, it’s Tate Modern’s overlooked and dusty uncle: Tate Britain.

 

Location – 15/20
Tate Britain is located in Pimlico, not really a must-see London neighbourhood. Though I did see a lot of people with carry-on suitcases so it might be an Airbnb nirvana? It’s about a 10 minute walk from the Pimlico Station or Vauxhall Station in Zone 1.

Pretty quick to get to, but since it’s a bit out of the center and there isn’t really another activity you can combine it with I’d say it loses some points.

Exhibits – 10/20
Holds a permanent British collection, offering an overview of paintings, photographs and sculptures by the island’s finest. It has all the big names but not the world-famous works you might know for them – it’s like the the B-sides of an album.

Value For Money – 20/20
Like most museums in London, anyone can browse the permanent collection for free while temporary exhibitions start at £13, which is very fair for the capital .

Layout – 10/ 20
To make sure you don’t miss anything, do grab a map as it’s easier to navigate. The placement of the paintings is hit and miss: in some rooms there would be 20 crowding a wall, while others would have a lot less, making it feel inconsistent. 

Wow Factor – 10/20
Points for the gorgeous neo-classical portico entrance, the dome ceiling and for that forgotten corner that’s left from how the building used to be in the 90s.

Total: 65/100 points. It’s a reasonable enough art museum, where you’ll have lots to enjoy, but it falls down for its lack of big-name pieces and it doesn’t have the grand magic of its newer, hipper brother on the South Bank – Tate Modern.

London - Seen & Done

Unlocking London: Open House

After having lost faith in humanity at Open House 2016 due to abysmal queuing set ups and swarms of rude crowds, in 2017 I only ventured to one tiny place, but this weekend I felt like giving the event another chance. Where better to go than the political heart of London?

Given the general distate for politics I was hoping everything would be empty – I was wrong, but it was the smoothest Open House experience. Once again I didn’t get picked in the 10 Downing Street ballot – has anyone ever been drafted? Or does my dodgy East European last name mean it’s a no no for me on security grounds?

Everyone has their favourites at Open House and mine was the Foreign and Commonwealth Office – it’s included in pretty much every news round-up, and was the main reason for me heading to Westminster. It was well worth the trip and probably my favourite Open House I’ve been to so far! I loved everything from the ceilings to the carpet and even the wallpapers. Also … seeing Palmerston, Chief Mouser to the FCO, himself was a purfect treat. And a shout-out to the organisers as it was super quick and efficient with a one-way system taking you everywhere.

Thanks to the Open House app it was easy to see what other places were nearby. I wouldn’t have known about HM Treasury, next door to the FCO which houses a hidden courtyard. Despite being the place where they spend all the money it was pretty stripped back compared to the grandiose FCO building, though they did have super comfy sofa booths. It also included a mini exhibition on the history of the building, for history/architecture geeks to get their rocks off. But really it WAS all about the round courtyard.

Some places only offered guided tours – despite the app not mentioning it, but with so many things on offer it was easy to simply walk to the next place. Having to go to court isn’t most people’s idea of a fun day out, let alone the Supreme Court, but when it’s housed in an amazing building I’m happy to volunteer as tribute. The UK Supreme Court comes with a dream library (though the books are a bit too dry for my liking) including ladders, a tower room and Harry Potter like stairs. If that wasn’t enough, you could also don various judge robes and wigs for your own legal catwalk experience – take that London Fashion Week!

Portcullis House is the little less loved brother of the Houses of Parliament. Sitting just opposite the famous landmark, it’s where lots of important political stuff happens but in a kinda ugly 90s style building. Despite this it has its charms: the open space and lots of light and a great spot to just catch a breath and process everything. While walking around the hall of political portraits I came up with the next Date Game Show hit: you have two potential love birds matched up with show centred around them walking around the hall and giving their opinion on the portraits – yes I know it’s not exactly Love Island, but let’s get some culture into our reality TV!

Another favourite was the Westminster Hall, the oldest part of the Houses of Parliament and reachable through a cool secret tunnel underneath from Portucllis House. I would have thought being in such a powerful place might have given me a kick, but it was more the giant mural paintings filled to the brim with bearded medieval dudes that really did it for me. It is also currently hosting a free exhibition on votes for women and the representation of women in the House of Commons and House of Lords, so learn about how kick-ass women fought for their suffrage with tickets via

If you look up boujee in the picture dictionary you will see a photo of Banqueting House with its mysterious cellar like space to its grand hall. It’s so extra the powder rooms come with a sit down and re-apply your make-up corner – sadly I wasn’t invited to the next ball/feast/extravaganza…

P.S this is the current state of Big Ben. Does it look bigger with a hood on?

Have you ever been to an Open House style event? Which was your favourite attraction?

London - Seen & Done

Things To Do in London: the Horniman Museum and Gardens

Central London in summer is my own personal little corner in hell. Just like many other major cities, London is starting to burst at the seams with overtourism, and to catch a peaceful moment I’ve started avoiding the major attractions – instead I head South of the river, to the far far East or even to the West!

One of those recent stops for me was re-visiting the Horniman Museum and Gardens – a quirky museum in Forest Hill which houses a lot of stuffed animals, musical instruments from all around the world and African, South American and Siberian anthropology.

We owe the place to Frederick John Horniman, a Victorian tea trader and avid traveller who brought back curious things from around the world to Forest Hill to let people share in on his passion. I assume his partner and friends got tired of hearing how he got Wally the Walrus for the 20th time so he opened up his display to the public. As the collection grew and grew and attracted more visitors I imagine his wife wasn’t too excited with people wandering around her house and so they secured a nearby building that still houses the museum and gardens. To top it off, there’s also a butterfly house, an aquarium and a crazy golf course – sadly it wasn’t the one from Alice in Wonderland, but is still worth a shot.

It doesn’t take more than 1 hour to see everything, which leaves enough time to go up the hill for the amazing view over central London, see the gardens in bloom and grab some food at the Saturday Farmer’s Market for a picnic on the grass. The collections are a bit dry and leave a lot to the imagination, but it’s kind of charming in old fashioned way with Wes Anderson style fonts and pastel colours, and did I mention it’s (mostly) for free?

It’s a bit out of Central London in Zone 3, so it might not be the ideal hotspot for your first visit, but definitely hop on the bus/train if you are visiting London for a second or third time or love stuffed animals, dried insects and a bash on the drums in the music room.

Do you have any undiscovered museum gems?

London

SCOOP Exhibition: The Wonderful World of Ice Cream Pop-up

Ice-cream museums recently popped up in New York and Los Angeles and now SCOOP is in town to serve up its take on the idea at Gasholders in King’s Cross. What better way to escape London’s heatwave than a visit to a cool, refreshing and tasty ice cream pop up exhibition?

Unlike the exhibitions in the US, you won’t find over-styled art installations that beg to clog up your Instagram, but a more informative take on your favourite treat, such as the history of early ice cream, with one room dedicated to Agnes B. Marshall, the Godmother of the frozen desserts in Victorian age.

The other sugary highlights included chilling in the ice room, sniffing obscure ingredients making your own ice cream, inhaling vanilla ice-cream fog, exploring ice cream paraphernalia, sampling lots of free ice cream (including a glow in the dark soft serve!) and tasting some unique, historic flavours, like daffodill or water mint – which, even as ice-cream aficionado, I’ve never seen before.

Not bothered to pay £12? Here’s what you’re missing out on…

The exhibition runs til 30 September at The British Museum of Food near King’s Cross Station. Tickets are £12.

What’s the weirdest ice-cream flavour you’ve ever had?

London

Lee Bul’s dystopian sci-fi playground @ Hayward Gallery

After being closed for a two-year refurbishment The Hayward Gallery is back in action and is showcasing the work of innovative South Korean artist Lee Bul – so it’s monster-like bodies, futuristic cyborgs and mirror mazes galore.

When it comes to modern art it’s the installations that do it for me, you know the one when you’re not sure if it’s a renovation or modern art. Bul’s work is definitely the latter and her work will whisk you away to different worlds filled with giant foil Zeppelins and immerse you in funhouse-style mirror mazes. That said, the exhibits sitting in large, bright open white gallery spaces didn’t match the tone and would have worked better in a darker environment with some moody music (BRB:majoring in art history, becoming a curator and making this happen – watch this (art) space!). One thing I really enjoyed was the storyboards showing the artist’s ideas developing, plus even little mini prototypes of the sculptures, was just refreshing to have the pieces explained visually as opposed to just the little text boxes.

Lee Bul: Crashing runs until 19 August 2018 and tickets start at £13. Also note the infinite mirror room that’s used in the promo material is beautiful, but be aware only the people are allowed in at a time and the place cramped.


Depending on how long you spend in the gift shop the visit will not take you longer than an hour. You might want to leave the ever-crowded Southbank area ASAP, but while you are nearby why not escape to The Queen Elizabeth Hall Room Garden – a hidden gem and a quiet getaway with a bar, riverside views and a green garden to explore, or eat something at the Southbank Centre Food Market – we’re talking tasty smells, tons of food on offer and a friendly atmosphere.